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SuperFriends Comic Book Character
Sargon, The Sorcerer
Sargon (JLA 98) 2
Information
Real name: John Sargent
AKA: Sargon the Sorcerer
Species: Homo magi
Homeworld: Earth
Universe: Earth-Two
Earth-One
Earth-1A
Relatives: Richard Biddle Sargent (father)
Mrs. Sargent (mother)

Honorary Justice League of America Team Member


Sargon Origin (All American Comics 26)

Origin revealed in All-American Comics, #26 (May, 1941).

Sargon (JLA 99)

As depicted in Justice League of America, #99 (June, 1972).


John Sargent was a stage magician, dressed like a swami complete with turban, to disguise the fact that he wielded true mystical powers. When John was a baby he came into contact with a piece of the Ruby of Life[1]

Background Information[2]

Sargon

As a wax figure in the Hall of Justice. Limited Collectors' Edition #C-41 (December 1975 / January 1976).

Over the millennia, the Ruby of Life was broken into several smaller pieces, one of which was discovered by an archaeologist in Egypt. Giving it to his wife, she wore it as a pendant. It was the first thing that their newborn child, John, saw and touched. Bonding with him in that manner allowed John to tap into Ruby's mystical energies. As a recent college grad, while John was visiting his mother, he discovered that the ruby would allow him to control anything he touches. He begins to study the tricks of stage magicians. He eventually became quite good and in high demand. At his mothers request, he took the named Sargon, The Magician as his stage name. Sargon was a Tiphranian, Priest-King.[3]

Sargon disappeared for a while, only to re-emerge as a villain due to an unfortunate side effect of possessing the Ruby of Life.[4]

A few years later, Sargon showed up to aid the Justice League in defeating Starbreaker.[5] This led to him being awarded an honorary membership in the Justice League.[6]


Powers and Abilities

Super powers

  • Cast Illusions: The Ruby of Life, gives the bearer to control whatever they touches, among other feats.

Abilities

  • Prestidigitation: Magic Tricks performed as entertainment.


Justice League Team Members

Members of the Justice League of America

Aquaman (founding member) • Batman (founding member) • Superman (founding member) • Flash (founding member)
Green Lantern (founding member) • Martian Manhunter (founding member) • Wonder Woman (founding member)

Comic Book JLA Team Members:
Black CanaryElongated ManRed TornadoZatanna Zatara
Phantom Stranger (part-time Leaguer) • Sargon, The Sorcerer (honorary Leaguer)

Other Known Justice Leaguers:
The HuntressBlack OrchidCaptain MarvelSupergirlGreen FuryPlastic ManAtomGreen Arrow

SuperFriends Founding Members:
SupermanBatmanWonder WomanAquaman
HawkmanSamuraiGreen LanternFlashBlack Vulcan

Other Known SuperFriends Members:
HawkgirlApache ChiefEl DoradoRima

Junior SuperFriends:
RobinCyborgFirestorm
ZanJayna
Marvin WhiteWendy Harris

Mascots:
GleekWonder Dog


Appearances

As a Wax Figure in late 1975:


Notes

  • Sargon first appears in All-American Comics, Vol. 1 #26 (May, 1941).[7]
  • He was created by John B. Wentworth and Howard Purcell.


External Links


References

  1. Over seven thousand years ago, Nommo, the immortal ruler of a destroyed civilization grew lonely. He created several artifacts of power, one of which was called the Ruby of Life. Nommo hoped that through the generations, the owners of these gems might evolve into beings capable of interbreeding with a species of homosapiens that utilized magic and would then be his new subjects. And so, according to the post-crisis story found in Secret Origins Vol. 2 #27 (June 1988), Nommo did indeed create this hero indirectly.
  2. Comics published during the Silver Age of comics merge this reality with the Golden Age, thus producing one continuous backstory.
  3. As revealed in All-American Comics, #26 (May, 1941).
  4. As revealed in The Flash, #186 (March, 1969).
  5. As revealed in Justice League of America, Vol. 1 #96, #97 and #98 (1972).
  6. As depicted in Justice League of America, Vol. 1 #99 (June, 1972), which can be found at the DC Database.
  7. Go to the DC Database for more on All-American Comics, Vol. 1 #26 (May, 1941).
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