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Green Arrow
GreenArrow4
Information
Real name: Oliver Queen[1]
AKA: The World’s Greatest Archer
The Emerald Archer
Species: Human
Homeworld: Earth
Universe: Earth-1A
Hair: Blond
Eyes: green
Height: 5'11
Weight: 195 lbs
Relatives: Dinah Lance (Life-Partner)
Apprentice: Speedy
Occupation: Superhero
Base: Star City, California
Affiliations: SuperFriends
Team Arrow
Abilities: Archery
Weaponry: Bow and Arrow
Trick Arrows
Voiced/Played: Norman Alden
Green Arrow Gallery

Justice League of America Team Member


Staunch member of the Justice League of America...
Old suit on display

Images from first SuperFriends Comic Book:
Limited Collectors' Edition, #C-41 (Dec. 1975/Jan. 1976)

Marvin in Arrow Suit (Limited Collectors' Edition, 76)
Marvin in Arrow Suit (Limited Collectors' Edition, 76) 2

Superman referencing adventure in
Justice League of America, #61 (March 1968).


Green Arrow is an incredibly skilled archer, and a worthy member of the Justice League. He is dressed like Robin Hood, who occasionally invents trick arrows.



Background Information

Continuity from Earth-One & Earth-1A

Earth-One & Earth-1A Continuity
In the parallel universe of Earth-One, Oliver Queen was a wealthy playboy and a world traveler. On a cruise aboard the ‘Kristina’ in the south seas, [in a pre-crisis retcon] Ollie is in full party mode on his yacht full of guest, when pirates show up harass the guests and throw Ollie overboard [as opposed to merely falling over].[2] He was washed up on a deserted island (which became known as Starfish Island) where he was forced to survive by any means necessary.
Origin (Adventure Comics 256)

Arrow honing his skills.
Image from Adventure Comics, #256/3 (January, 1959)

He made a make-shift bow and arrows to hunt for food. He also developed an arsenal of trick arrows, like the drill arrow, and the rope arrow, as well as assembling a green suit for camouflage. [In a pre-crisis retcon, Ollie does not see a commercial freighter that has stopped by the island and swims out with the hopes of being rescued, instead] Ollie hears a commotion one night as he is in the jungle. As he pears over rocks overlooking the shore, he sees the very same pirates that threw him overboard stashing their loot. Before they can complete the task and kill the seamen they coerced to take them to the Island, Ollie springs into action. The seamen then rescue Ollie.[3] Upon arriving back home in Star City, Ollie realizes that he is changed by his experiences, and decides to give something back to society, in as exciting a way as possible – becoming a crime-fighter under the guise of Green Arrow, using his archery skills for good.[4]

With his new lease on life, he eventually met Roy Harper Jr., who grew up on an Indian reservation after his parents died in an explosion. His mentor Chief Thunderhead trained and raised him to be an incredible archer in hunting and competition, then sent him out into the world to seek his destiny.[5] When Roy’s mentor’s health began to fail, he decided the perfect new guardian for young Harper would be the Green Arrow. Roy auditioned several times to become his assistant and proved his skill and mettle, receiving the name Speedy because of how fast he was.[6]

(In early 1971, in the Earth-1A universe) The Arrow takes his new sidekick, Roy Harper (aka Speedy) to the island of his origin, Starfish Island. They had heard Professor Hagen had been lost in the area during a storm. As they search for the professor, they are attacked by a lost tribe of Indians. In the attack, the Arrowplane is damaged and they are captured. Using his wit, he is able to offset any future harm and leave unscathed with the professor.[7] At the exact same time, a historic meeting is taking place. Superman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Flash and civilian Hal Jordan help rescue J'onn J'onzz, a Manhunter from Mars (who had been on earth for the past four years in human disguise as a police detective John Jones)[8] from Commander Blanx and his battalion of White Martians. The heroes on hand decide to wait on making the rescue public fearing a panic over the presence of aliens on earth. This informally joining of forces, was even kept a secret even from Green Arrow.[9] It would not be long after this occasion that Hal Jordan received the mantle of Green Lantern over sector 2814[10] and the Justice League would become an official team.[11]

On a notable occasion, the newly formed Justice League[12] encounters the villainous Carthan who has captured Green Arrow. Carthan challenges the JLA to overcome the three engines of doom he has placed strategically around the earth. Splitting into three teams, the League manage to disarm the engines of doom, but then find themselves trapped inside a huge diamond from which there is no escape. The only way out is if Green Arrow can hit the weak spot in the diamond with pinpoint accuracy. He takes aim and hits the crystal's stress point. Returning to their headquarters, the JLA votes in Green Arrow as their newest member. Ollie becomes the first non-charter member to join the team.[13]

It would not be long before the Arrow, joins his fellow JLAers on a historic cross-universe mission. Batman chairs a meeting and tells the team that he just learned that Chronos, Doctor Alchemy and Felix Faust have banded together as the Crime Champions and intend to commit three crimes simultaneously. The group splits into three teams to take down each of the super-villains. Meanwhile, on the parallel world of Earth-Two, the Justice Society of America have received a challenge from three of their most well-known adversaries: The Fiddler, the Icicle and the Wizard. After a series battles, the Crime Champions are defeated. Each villain is imprisoned on his respective homeworld.[14]

While still a young teen, Speedy joins forces with Wonder Girl, Aqualad, Kid Flash and 'junior Justice Leaguer', Robin in order to free their mentors in the Justice League from the mind-control of an alien energy-being called the Antithesis. They defeat this foe and together the five teens decide to become a real team, calling themselves the Teen Titans. Speedy decided to be a part-time member.[15]

Angry with the Team (Justice League of America 66) 2

Angry with the team.
Image from Justice League of America, #66 (November, 1968).

After several adventures with the JLA, Ollie was destined for change. The catalyst for change came in few parts: The League turns down a job they deemed to be too trivial. Superman tells him that “as defenders of injustices, they can only be concerned with major breeches of the law.” The Arrow is furious that they won’t help out all those in need, and storms off.[16] Also, at this time, Ollie starts dating the widowed Dinah Lance (aka the Black Canary). This relationship caused a further rift from the rest of the League. Also at this time, the businessman Oliver loses his fortune to corporate fat-cats.[17] This change is personified more conclusively represented in a change in costume, and growing out his signature goatee.[18][citation needed]

From this point forward, Oliver Queen/Green Arrow became a mouth-piece for the underprivileged and political left. Faced with his new-found outlook on life, he did what all lost souls in the late 1960s did – he hit the road with a friend. He teams up with Hal Jordan (aka Green Lantern). Together they embark on a quest in a beat-up pickup truck to "find America," along the way witnessing the problems of corruption, racism, pollution, as well as overpopulation confronting the nation. Each would find their beliefs challenged by the other. Jordan wanted to work within the system and was more concerned about dealing with criminals; where Oliver advocated social change. He did manage to convince Jordan to see beyond his strict obedience to the Green Lantern Corps, and to help those who were neglected or discriminated against. As Ollie and Hal traveled the country, they were occasionally joined by Dinah. Ollie helped Dina learn how to control her new sonic powers.[19]

Cover (Green Lantern 85 September 1971)

Speedy, who did not go with them on the road, dabbled with drugs while Ollie was away. This caused the two to go their separate ways for a time[20] (Roy eventually made his way back to the Teen Titans).[21] In the aftermath, Ollie sets out on his own and starts down a path that would ultimately lead him to being a newspaper columnist and run for Star City Mayor. Hal runs into an interesting and noteworthy predicament of his own as he investigates an earthquake that hits Coast City. He saves the life of Guy Gardner, who is injured after being hit by a bus. Hal knows that this man is earth’s back-up Green Lantern should something happen to him. Now he's in a coma with a severe head injury. This worries Hal. Suddenly, the image of one of the Guardians of the Universe appears, stating that there must be an alternate replacement selected – John Stewart.[22]

During the Arrow’s solo career, he would meet Merlyn the archer, who would become one of his most fearsome foes.[23]

While tracking a thug in Star City, Green Arrow is ambushed and outnumbered. With an arm that has been injured several times in recent months, his archery isn't as accurate as it should be, but he risks firing an arrow to disarm a sniper. He is horrified when his bad arm causes him to miss his shot and kill the sniper. Dinah hears of this regrettable occurrence and calls Hal. Hal flies over to Oliver's tenement, arriving before anyone else. He finds Oliver's arrows broken and his costume shredded, leaving the question open as to Oliver's fate. Ollie however, telling no one, spends a few months in an ashram monastery, shedding the remaining trappings of his super-heroic life (including crashing the Arrowplane into a mountain).[24] He would find no peace there, and returned to the outside world seeking out Dinah. He and Dinah entered the job market and started a life together away from the Justice League. Ollie pursued a career in public relations, coming into some money and Dinah went back to running a florist as she did on Earth-Two.[25]

In the parallel universe of Earth-1A, it is late 1976. Oliver is on an assignment in Bornego, Africa. He hears that the world's population of humans have begun to shrink to two-inches tall. This proved to be a plot by masterminded criminal, Doctor Hiram Gulliver. This mad scientist had captured all the SuperFriends (Batman, Aquaman, Wonder Woman and Superman) except for Wendy and Marvin. The Jr. Superfriends reach out to Green Arrow because he was the only the Justice League member that was left on Earth. The other members were off world on a space mission. The Emerald Archer inexplicably also shrank but was not captured. At two-inches tall, He stormed Gulliver's Castle like a Tom Thumb version of Robin Hood. He defeated the mad scientist, returned the SuperFriends and everyone else on Earth to normal size.[26]

After this assignment, Ollie went back to Dinah and the two of them team-up over the next few years. During this time they go up against the likes of the Rainbow Archer and Slingshot.[27]

While adventuring with Dinah, Oliver believes could do some good as the mayor of Star City and revisits the idea. Unfortunately, Ollie losing the election thanks to the meddling of the Crime Syndicate.[28]

Not long after this defeat, Oliver accepts a job offer to write a column for Daily Star’s editorial column.[29]

Exclusive to the parallel universe of Earth-1A, Zan and Jayna from Exor arrive on earth and are rescued by Jr. SuperFriends, Wendy and Marvin. They tell a tale of Grax (Superman’s old enemy) and a plot to cause havoc all over the world. They contact the Justice League and they all meet at Justice League Satellite. Olive joins them. They are told that Grax has scattered 12 deadly bombs throughout the Earth – one on the six visible continents, one on an unseen continent, and one on five inhabited islands. The first four bombs are set to go off in less than an hour. If they fail to go off, the next five will be activated 26 minutes later. Then the final three, 47 minutes after that. The first group will destroy the people’s memory of the past. The second group will wipe everyone’s mind blank ... so they wouldn’t even know enough to eat. We don’t know what the last group three will do. Green Arrow heads to Australia to meet up with Hugh Dawkins (aka the Tasmanian Devil). This bomb is unique in that it is made with White Kryptonite, which is not harmful to Superman but will fill the atmosphere, eventually killing all plant life on Earth. Next, the Arrow along with Batman, Robin, Hawkman, Hawkgirl, Superman and Green beam down to Antarctica. They of course dismantle the bombs and save the day. His efforts and the efforts of the rest of the JLAers and international heroes, thwarts the evil genius’ plan.[30]

While not an active member in the JLA, Ollie does nominate and sponsor Black Lightning’s induction into the League. Even though Jefferson was indicted onto the team on his own merit, Oliver’s pushing for ethnic diversity was met with backlash from fellow Leaguers.[31] This led him to officially tender his resignation from the Justice League.[32]

Ollie takes to outlandish indulgences[33] and the occasional ‘globe-trotting’ to fight local injustices. Once to the Caribbean[34] to battling Count Vertigo in Vlatava and then the Soviet Union.[35]

Ollie’s tension with the overall JLA, does not extend to all Leaguers. He shows up on unannounced at the Wayne Foundation Penthouse, to ask a favor of Bruce Wayne. He wants Bruce to appear as the Dark Knight in an escape artist show, hosted by Ollie’s friend Samson Citadel. Bruce agrees on the condition, provided Oliver helps him patrol Gotham City. Batman could use his help, because the Gotham City Police Department has reached out needing assistance in finding the criminals responsible for the new wave of seemingly impossible crimes. The crooks seem to be able to break into buildings and rob safes without using force. The two heroes go out at night and they spot a crime in progress at the Gotham Museum. Batman and Arrow split to capture the thugs. As Oliver is about to capture one of the thugs with his Trick Arrows, but the criminal escapes from the arrow, even though it should be a fool-proof. Batman deduces that the criminal mastermind behind the recent crimes is Arrow's friend, Samson Citadel, but Green Arrow won't believe it and goes to ask his friend about it. Meanwhile, Batman is captured by Rhinehart, the master in hypnotist. As Oliver is with his friend, Samson, Rhinehart orders him to attack. But Samson can’t do it and falls unconscious. Rhinehart realizes his predicament and starts to run, but his escape attempt is thwarted by Batman – a master escape artist himself. Rhinehart has been arrested and the crimes stopped.[36]

Oliver is called to action one afternoon after hearing gunfire in his hotel. He dawns his Green Arrow costume to investigate. He arrives to find shooters having just gunned down a man in the hallway. The Emerald Archer brings down the first killer with a bolo arrow and then takes off in pursuit of the second. He catches up with the second killer on the roof, and beats him into unconsciousness. The archer returns to the victim. The man breathes his last. His dying words indicate that the oil tycoon, Bo Force, is involved in murder. Arrow then calls in the police to report the shooting before going out to investigate things further in his alter-ego of reporter Oliver Queen. He arrives at the south gate of Force's property, to interview Force. Instead, Force's guards beat Queen down, before forcibly ousting him from the property. Back in Metropolis, Superman, in his guise as Clark Kent, is preparing to depart for an evening out with Lois Lane and Jimmy Olsen, when he hears the message left on his answering machine by a man named Fred Garmer. Clark declines to spend the evening with the pair and heads out to investigate as Superman. Meanwhile, the Arrow has decided to rent a plane to scout out Force's property. The plane is brought down by anti-aircraft rockets and Arrow parachutes to safety, taking out Force's gunnels as he descends to the Earth. At that exact moment, Superman arrives. He diverts the destroyed plane before its hits a nearby farmhouse. On the ground, Oliver is beaten into submission by an army of Bo's thugs. Suddenly an earthquake hits the location. Superman goes to investigate and finds that an underground river that feeds the Thor Geyser (the study of which is the whole reason behind the location of Force’s property) has caused an eruption in a nearby town. After plugging the hole with a sheared off mountain top, Superman attends to the fireball created by the explosive water. Flying around it at super-speed, Superman creates a vortex which carries the burning water into space. At that same moment, the Arrow disarms and knocks out Bo. Superman reports to the Arrow that the final eruption would be the Thor Geyser's last. Force is then taken into custody for Fred Garmer’s murder.[37]

In addition to fighting injustices globally, he also fought the tide of crime in the streets of Star City while living in an inner-city apartment: a computer crime by the criminal Hi-Tek;[38] dealing with strikes by unruly Teamsters;[39] the bringing down of a pretty thief and urban graffiti artist named Ozone; [40] Afghani terrorists;[41] a motorcycle gang;[42] and an attack on the Star City World's Fair.[43]

While still living in his in inner-city apartment and trying to be the urban every-man, his world is turned on its head, when he is invited to the reading of a will from recently deceased, long-time family friend, Abby Horton. He suddenly becomes the beneficiary of a substantial sum of money. Ollie however, feels her death is suspect and uncovers a plot by corporate titans.[44]

After Ollie sorts out the death of his heiress friend, he teams-up John Stewart (aka Green Lantern II) to counter the menace of a crystalline alien warrior who absorbs people.[45]

Ollie teams up with Dinah and a handful of Leaguers to to take down a villain Paragon and then Hellrazer.[46]

The following year, the Arrow teams up with his old partner, Green Lantern to bring down the Demolition Team who recently destroyed Ferris Aircraft. After their defeat, Hal faces the choice of continuing as a ring-wielder, or quitting to stay with Carol Ferris.[47] He decides turn in his ring to the Guardians, telling them he wishes to give up his heroic identity.[48]

While Green Arrow and Black Canary are on patrol in Star City looking out for thugs, one of which wounds Black Canary with another arrow.[49] Green Arrow gets an ambulance for the Black Canary, then answers the challenge of Pete Lomax and easily defeats him in a duel of arrows.[50]

Crisis on Infinite Earths

Crisis on Infinite Earths

Crisis on Infinite Earths

Main Article: Crisis on Infinite Earths

July 1985, Star City – The skies overhead have turned red. Weather around the world is out of whack. All the signs point to the coming of Armageddon. The Arrow and Canary are on hand saving as many citizens as possible. John Stewart as the ‘new’ Green Lantern of earth Sector 2814 and Katma Tui of Sector 1417 are also present having just returned from a mission in space.[51] They are just as confused as the other heroes. Earth’s Green Lantern is approached by the Harbinger. She tells him that the Crisis has come and that he needs to come with her and serve as an agent of someone called the Monitor. Mistaking her warnings as threats, Stewart tries to detain Harbinger, and a fight breaks out between those present. Ultimately, Stewart decides she is not lying and it is best to go with her. Katma protests and says the Guardians assigned the two of them as a team. John says his goodbyes and disappears with the Harbinger. Katma and Canary look on, worried. Ollie chimes in and says, “No sweat Katma! Our earth GL’s are tough cookies.” As they stare at the space where John was, the rain gets worse. Katma contacts the Guardians and she phases out. After she consults with the Guardians, she returns and and tells Ollie and Canary that the Guardians were both surprised and worried after she reveals the name of the Monitor to them. She then leaves saying that she must check Sector 2813. As she leaves, Dinah leans into Ollie and says she needs a big hug. Ollie says he needs one too.[52]

The Arrow and his allies turn up again, aboard a strange satellite. The heroes have been summoned by Alex Luthor Jr. of Earth-Three, Pariah and Harbinger. This trio has brought together a massive congregation of heroes from Earth-One and Earth-Two – against their will. Together the three explain that a being called the Anti-Monitor is consuming all positive-matter realities, but also explain that in order for things to correct themselves, the Multiverse must be folded back upon itself and become a single universe – the way it was intended, or else all worlds will be destroyed.[53]

The Arrow and Canary’s first mission after the initial gathering is to clean up the debris from the destroyed Justice League Satellite, after Red Tornado’s body exploded.[54] The pair finds themselves in Michigan, along with Firestorm, Martian Manhunter, (and Justice League Detroit members) Steel and Vibe. After the debris is cleared, the young guys blame Arrow and his old teammates for the satellites destruction. As Firestorm intervenes, Dinah mourns the loss of Reddy. Meanwhile, Kathy Sutton (Red Toranado’s wife) arrives at home to find Red Tornado reaching out to her through her television. Sutton follows the Red Tornado's trail. Soon the Arrow and Dinah arrive at the Justice League Detroit Headquarters. They are discussing the destruction of Red Tornado and the impossibility of putting him back together again. Firestorm interjects and tells the Leaguers present that Red Tornado’s body was inhabited by a sentient Tornado Spirit, so he may not be completely gone. As they discuss, they are contacted by Elongated Man, who is at the S.T.A.R. Labs Weather Research Center along with Zatanna. They tell them that something, perhaps the Anti-Monitor has taken over three weather satellites resulting in aberrant, and dangerous, weather patterns throughout the world. The Arrow and Canary, along with Firestorm, Nuclear Man, Batman, Black Lightning and Geo-Force use their radar to seek out the epicenter/warp of what may be controlling the satellites. As they arrive, the rain is out of control. They spot a woman on a bridge in the rain. It’s Kathy Sutton. After consultation with Kathy, our heroes deduce the Red Tornado’s mind has occupied the three weather control satellites. The Martian Manhunter, and Superman destroy the three weather satellites. Sutton amazingly is able to convince the Red Tornado to resume a more human form. Superman flash freezes the Red Tornado, with his super-breath. Firestorm, the Nuclear Man imprisons the Red Tornado, in a steel block. The Red Tornado bursts free, growing, once more, to gigantic size. Believing Sutton has betrayed him, the Red Tornado renounces all ties to humanity. The Red Tornado taunts the JLA by saying that that they may be able to save the world from the Anti-Monitor, but warns that a reckoning will be forthcoming. He then vanishes into he sky.[55]

On Earth-S, the Arrow and Canary engage in battle against a cadre of Super-Villains. While their fate is unknown, Killer Frost and Captain Cold successfully freeze the planet surface, including Aquaman and his beloved Mera. And so, our heroes lose this battle and Earth-S becomes the territory of super-villains. This is the last we see of the Earth-One version of the Arrow and Canary.[56]


Powers and Abilities

Powers

None.

Abilities

  • Survival: He was forced to learn this while stranded on Starfish Island.
  • Acrobatics: He has displayed on many occasions that he is an expert in acrobatics, and often uses this skill while evading enemy fire.
  • Archery: Oliver Queen is perhaps the finest archer ever known. He has a wide-variety of trick arrows, ranging from bola arrows to time-bomb arrows to his infamous boxing-glove arrow. Green Arrow has shown the ability to shoot an arrow down the barrel of a gun, pierce a drop of water as it leaves a tap, and shoot almost any part of the human body; although he aims only to wound and not kill when he shoots.
  • Aviation: He used to own and fly his own airplane called the Arrowplane. He still has some skill in flying different types of planes.
  • Firearms: Although not his preferred weapon, Oliver is very skilled in the use of firearms. He has displayed great accuracy with handguns and machine guns.
  • Hunting: Archery is by far Oliver's preferred method of hunting however the ability to hunt comes from years of training, patience and survival.
  • Martial Arts: He is proficient in several forms of hand-to-hand combat including:
  • Stick Fighting: Oliver has shown to be a highly skilled stick fighter.
  • Swordsmanship: Ollie is also very proficient with a sword, though it is not his preferred weapon of choice.
  • Strength: Due to extensive archery training, Ollie's arm strength is superior to that of the average man. He once broke free from a metal chain over a course of a few hours.[57]


Weaknesses

Being human / mortality


Equipment


Transportation


Justice League Team Members

Members of the Justice League of America

Aquaman (founding member) • Batman (founding member) • Superman (founding member) • Flash (founding member)
Green Lantern (founding member) • Martian Manhunter (founding member) • Wonder Woman (founding member)

Comic Book JLA Team Members:
Black CanaryElongated ManRed TornadoZatanna Zatara
Phantom Stranger (part-time Leaguer) • Sargon, The Sorcerer (honorary Leaguer)

Other Known Justice Leaguers:
The HuntressBlack OrchidCaptain MarvelSupergirlGreen FuryPlastic ManAtomGreen Arrow

SuperFriends Founding Members:
SupermanBatmanWonder WomanAquaman
HawkmanSamuraiGreen LanternFlashBlack Vulcan

Other Known SuperFriends Members:
HawkgirlApache ChiefEl DoradoRima

Junior SuperFriends:
RobinCyborgFirestorm
ZanJayna
Marvin WhiteWendy Harris

Mascots:
GleekWonder Dog


Episode Appearances

SuperFriends TV Series, Season 1 (1973):

SuperFriends Comic Book:


Notes

  • Green Arrow first appeared in More Fun Comics #73 in 1941.[60]
  • He was created by Mort Weisinger and George Papp.
  • In 1969, artist Neal Adams in the pages of the Brave and the Bold, Vol. 1 #85,[61] decided to update the character's visual appearance by giving him a goatee beard and costume of his own design
  • Inspired by Adams' redesign, writer Dennis O'Neil followed up on Green Arrow's new appearance by completely remaking the character's attitude in the pages of Justice League of America, Vol. 1 #75 (cover-dated November 1969),[62] giving his personality a rougher edge.
  • It is not sure if the SuperFriends Version was based on the Golden Age version of the character, or the Silver Age. Green Arrow's appearance is definitely modeled after his Silver-Age counterpart.


Trivia

  • Green Arrow was regrettably on only one episode the SuperFriends TV Series.
  • This is Green Arrow's first animated appearance.


External Links


Appearances in Other Media


References

  1. His name was not given in the series.
  2. Retconned origin is revealed in DC Super-Stars,#17/3 (November/December 1977) and Green Arrow, #1 (May 1983).
  3. Retconned origin is revealed in DC Super-Stars,#17/3 (November/December 1977) and Green Arrow, #1 (May 1983).
  4. As revealed in Adventure Comics, #256/3 (January, 1959).
  5. As revealed in Adventure Comics, #209 (Feb. 1955).
  6. As revealed in Adventure Comics, #262 (July, 1959). This origin for Roy is contradictory to the one revealed in Adventure comics, #209 (February, 1955). In the updated origin, Roy’s mentor not Chief Thunderhead, it is a great archer named Brave Bow who owed his father, Roy Harper, Sr. a great debt.
  7. This adventure involving Green Arrow and Speedy is revealed in Adventure Comics, #256 (January, 1959).
  8. As revealed in Detective Comics, #225 (November, 1955). The Martian’s origin is retold in Justice League of America, #144 (July, 1977).
  9. As revealed in Justice League of America, #144 (July, 1977).
  10. As revealed in Showcase, #22 (October, 1959).
  11. As revealed in Justice League of America, #9 (February, 1962).
  12. The 'official' JLA team-up is revealed in Justice League of America, #9 (February, 1962).
  13. As revealed in Justice League of America, #4 (April/May 1961).
  14. As revealed in Justice League of America, #21 (August 1963) and #22 (September 1963).
  15. As revealed in Teen Titans, #53 (February, 1978). E. Nelson Bridwell established Robin's Titan status as Earth-1A continuity in the pages of the SuperFriends Comic Book: issue #1. This is also seen in all three episodes of The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure (1967) and a comic book series simply entitled, the Teen Titans. It ran for 53 issues with a nearly 3 year hiatus from 1966-78.
  16. As revealed in Justice League of America, #66 (November, 1968).
  17. As revealed in Justice League of America, #75 (November 1969). See also: Wells, John (December 2010). "Green Lantern/Green Arrow: And Through Them Change an Industry." Back Issue! TwoMorrows Publishing (45): 39–54. Levitz notes the significance of this issue in 75 Years of DC Comics: “It was a jarring transition: Fox’s stories were rich in plot but light on characterization. By contrast, O’Neil concentrated less on complex stories and more on giving each hero an individual voice for the first time. Fox’s Leaguers were interchangeable; O’Neil’s bantered, bickered, fought and joked. Under Fox, they were a team because of their similarities; under O’Neil, they were a team despite their differences.”
  18. As seen in The Brave and the Bold, #85 (August/September 1969). See also: McAvennie, Michael; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1960s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. Dorling Kindersley. p. 134. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9. Oliver Queen got a new look for a new age from Neal Adams. In the DC Comics Year By Year: A Visual Chronicle (McAvennie, Michael; Dolan, Hannah, ed.; 2010. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9), the significance of the change is not underrated. On p. 134 he says that: “Artist Neal Adams targeted the Emerald Archer for a radical redesign that ultimately evolved past the surface level…the most significant aspect of this issue was Adams’ depiction of Oliver Queen’s alter ego. He had rendered a modern-day Robin Hood, complete with goatee and mustache, plus threads that were more befitting an ace archer.” [need citation]
  19. As revealed in Green Lantern & Green Arrow #76 - #122 (starting in April of 1970 and ending in November of 1979). See also: Wells, John (December 2010). "Green Lantern/Green Arrow: And Through Them Change an Industry". Back Issue!. TwoMorrows Publishing (45): 39–54. And: O'Neil, Dennis (June 2004). ‘Introduction.’ "Green Lantern/Green Arrow Vol. 1." DC Comics. ISBN 978-1-4012-0224-8. O’Neil and Adams directly tackled racism, poverty, drugs, and other social ills. O’Neil remarks in his introduction to the 1983 reprint that while the stories were published in the early 1970s, “the stories belong to the previous decade as much as surely as do Owlsley Acid, the Fillmore, protest marches, draft-card burning, the Johnson Presidency and those innocent arrogant naifs, the Flower Children.” [need citation]. It was the start of a major shift in the direction of comics industry in the US.
  20. This was a first in DC comics, in an award-winning story in Green Lantern, #85-86 (September & November 1971), part of a classic, 14-issue run by the writer-artist team of Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams. For more on issue 85 and issue 86, go to the DC Database.
  21. See Teen Titan, Vol. 1 Issues #44 - #53 (1976-78).
  22. As revealed in Green Lantern, #87 (December, 1971). The notion of Ollie running for mayor is explored again in World’s Finest Comics, #210 (March 1972).
  23. As revealed in Justice League of America, #94 (November, 1971).
  24. As revealed in Flash, Vol. 1 #217 (September, 1972) through #219 (January, 1973), which can be found at the DC Database.
  25. As revealed in Action Comics, #421 (February, 1973) through #455 (January, 1976) and Brave and the Bold, #106 (April 1973).
  26. As seen in the SuperFriends TV Show, Season 1 episode: Gulliver’s Gigantic Goof (December 8, 1973).
  27. As revealed in World’s Finest Comic, #244 (May 1977) through World’s Finest Comics, #283 (September 1982).
  28. Elliot S! Maggin wrote a sequel to the “What Can One Man Do?” story from Green Green Lantern & Green Arrow, #85 (August, 1971) in the pages of World’s Finest Comics, #255 (February/March 1979). Entitled “Nothing But a Man”. In an interview with Jayme Lynn Blaschke, on the now defunct Green Arrow Fansite, Maggin reminisces on the origins of that stand-out story: “I wrote “What Can One Man Do?” as an inspired amateur. By the time, eight years later, I wrote “Nothing But a Man,” I had been a professional writer for sometime and the work had passed from diversion to … work. There were all sorts of political repercussions to everything I did and said, it seemed, and I had gotten into this frame of mind where I stepped out of myself once in awhile to look at my life and personal fortunes objectively. I think that, with Green Arrow as my personal Everyman, that was what I was expressing in “Nothing But a Man.” It was my last Green Arrow story, and I intended it to be. When I wrote the first one, I was a junior in college in the middle of an election of my own. I was running for President of the Student Council. As it happens, I won. Or so I learned about six months later. A friend who was an officer of the Student Council at Brandeis was apparently funneling money into some personal expenses, and it was his judgment that he would be found out if I were elected. So he contrived to get someone he considered more malleable elected — without that person’s participation in this little voter fraud. This was all real life…So years later, when I wrote the story of the upshot of my first Green Arrow story, I was actually telling the story of what was going on with me during the time I wrote that first story”.
  29. As revealed in World’s Finest Comics, #258 (August/September 1979).
  30. While this story is recorded in the SuperFriends ComicBook, issues #7 (October, 1977);#8 (November, 1977); and #9 (December, 1977).
  31. As revealed in Justice League of America, #173 (December 1979).
  32. As revealed in Justice League of America, #181 (August, 1980).
  33. As revealed in World’s Finest Comics, #261 (February/March 1980).
  34. As revealed in World’s Finest Comics, #269 (July 1981).
  35. As revealed in World’s Finest Comics, #272 and #273 (October/November 1981).
  36. As revealed in Brave and the Bold, #168 (November 1980).
  37. As revealed in DC Comics Presents, #20 (April 1980).
  38. As revealed in Detective Comics , #521 (December 1982)
  39. As revealed in Detective Comics between, #523 – #525 (February – April, 1983).
  40. As revealed in Detective Comics between, #527 – #529 (June – August, 1983).
  41. As revealed in Detective Comics between, #530 – #532 (September – November, 1983).
  42. As revealed in Detective Comics between, #533 – #536 (December, 1983 – March 1984).
  43. As revealed in Detective Comics , #543 (October, 1984)
  44. As revealed in the four-part 1983 Mini-Series: Green Arrow, #1 – #4 (May-August of 1983)
  45. As revealed in Green Lantern, #165 (June 1983).
  46. As revealed in Justice League of America, #224 though #226 (March – May 1984).
  47. As revealed in Green Lantern, #180 (September 1984).
  48. As revealed in Green Lantern, #181 (October,1984).
  49. As revealed in Detective Comics, #549/2 (April, 1985).
  50. As revealed in Detective Comics, #550/2 (May 1985).
  51. This mission in space is revealed in Green Lantern, #193 (October, 1985).
  52. As revealed in Green Lantern, #194 (November, 1985).
  53. As revealed in Crisis on Infinite Earths #5 (August, 1985).
  54. As revealed in Crisis on Infinite Earths #8 (November, 1985).
  55. As revealed in Justice League of America Annual, #3 (1985).
  56. As revealed in Crisis on Infinite Earths #9 (December 1985).
  57. As revealed in Green Lantern & Green Arrow, # 89 (April, 1972)
  58. As revealed in the Season 1 (1973) episode: Gulliver's Gigantic Goof.
  59. As revealed in the SuperFriends Comic Book, in the Limited Collectors' Edition #C-41 issue, published in January 1976.
  60. Go to DC Database for more on More Fun Comics, Vol. 1 #73 (November 1941)
  61. Go to DC Database for more on Brave and the Bold, Vol. 1 #85 (September, 1969)
  62. Go to DC Database for more on Justice League of America, Vol. 1 #75 (November 1969)
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